SLAM articles

  • Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Wood Engraving and The Private Library 


    Collecting Rare Books and First Editions - Wood Engraving and The Private Library
    Published 14 May 2014

    Wood engraving was derided for decades by many artists as merely a "reproductive technique," since the design of a wood engraving and the actual carving of a wood engraving generally were done as separate processes by separate people (as noted in a previous post).  It was not until the 1930s that designer and engraver began to merge into the persona of a single individual, as several progressive artists began to use wood engravings as a way to bring art "to the masses." As the design and the carving of wood engravings began to merge into the persona of a single individual in the 1930s (as mentioned in yesterday's post), the art form began to attract some of this past century's most talented illustrators: Eric Gill, Gwen Raverat, Paul Landacre, Agnes Miller Parker, Fritz Eichenberg ... the list is quite large.  We're going to look at the work of a few of these talented individuals, and we're going to consider some specific ways in which we can most inexpensively build a private library of books illustrated by wood engravings.

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